We Americans are pretty independent people. In fact, independence is often considered a hallmark of Americanness, a particular American virtue if you will. For the next few minutes, however, please allow me to celebrate the antithesis to personal independence, that is, the virtue of community. I have been inspired recently to extol the virtues of community by the many parents and students at Trinitas who work behind the scenes to support each other and the school.

The end of the school year is a time when teachers are rushing frantically to get in all those last minute field trips they haven’t had time for during the year, and this year has been no exception. So much coming and going of whole classes of students—and sometimes two classes at a time—has been happening in recent days that I can hardly keep up. But the community has met the challenge to make sure we have parents in place to plan, drive for, and chaperone field trips—and often at the last minute because of unforeseen weather changes. Because of so many parents’ willingness to sacrifice their time and talent, field trips and feast days have been exactly what they’re supposed to be for our students: fun and educational.

A few students in the Grammar School have needed a little extra help this year with one class or another, and I have been amazed at the way our older students have been willing to meet those needs. Teenagers happily working with younger children is not as common in the world as we might wish it was, but it is alive and well at Trinitas. One testimony to a thriving community is the lack of division based on age. Our students clearly feel a connectedness to each other regardless of age, and that makes for a sweet spirit in the school.

Finally, what a blessing our golf tournaments were! And what a testimony to our community as well. We really went out on a limb hosting two tournaments this year instead of one, but again, the community rose to the occasion. Though all the planning and the work and the cleanup that were done proved to be an amazing accomplishment, I am amazed more by the generosity of our volunteers and supporters. These golf tournaments raise money primarily for tuition assistance, but the volunteers were representative of our entire community, not only those families who actually receive tuition assistance. This is the sort of cooperation that not only testifies of the community but strengthens community across barriers that could divide.

If Americans are known for being independent-minded, Christians are known for being community-minded. So what do you get with an American Christian? I can’t speak for every place, but I know at Trinitas, we get like-minded families who live and work together in peace, sharpening one another as iron sharpens iron (Prov 27:17). Thank God for community!